Maritim Hotel Heringsdorf - Superior Maritim Hotel Heringsdorf - Pool Maritim Hotel Heringsdorf - summer garden HER_354_Gesichtsbehandlung HER_241.jpg
per room

Places of interest

Heringsdorf is a part of the 'Dreikaiserbäder' (Three Imperial Spas) county on the island of Usedom. The other two Baltic seaside resorts making up the trio are Ahlbeck and Bansin. The pier in Heringsdorf stretches into the Baltic for a distance of 508 m, making it Germany's longest. Aside from the Maritim Hotel Kaiserhof, the beach promenade is also home to a number of impressive villas.


Heringsdorf Pier

Heringsdorf's first pier - the "Kaiser-Wilhelm-Brücke" - was built in the last decade of the 19th century. At 500 m long, it was Germany's longest and in addition to servicing the steamboats that ran between Ückermünde, Anklam, Ahlbeck, Swinemünde and Stettin, it was also home to a number of businesses. The original bridge was destroyed by fire and ice in the middle of the 20th century before being rebuilt in 1995. 8 metres longer than its predecessor, the new pier is not only the longest in Germany, it's the longest in continental Europe. Once again, the pier has attracted business and the half kilometre walk into the Baltic is complemented by interesting shops, enticing cafes and top restaurants. The pier is also home to a wax museum and shell museum.


Bäderarchitektur (Seaside resort architecture)

The Three Imperial Spas Heringsdorf Ahlbeck and Bansin are home to some of the country's best examples of seaside resort architecture. Typical for the style are grandiose columns supporting spacious balconies. A large number of the villas were constructed in the late half of the 19th century and years leading up to the first World War as summer residences by Germany's upper class. They reflect the extravagant nature of society's elite during this golden age in history.
Kaiserbäder Express: board the tyred sightseeing train and experience the Three Imperial Spas from the comfort of an open carriage



The exhibition pieces on display in engineer's birthplace, Anklam are a testament to the pioneer's important contribution to human flight. Lilienthal's gliders were a milestone in heavier than air flight - transcending the mere fantasy of flying - and helped pave the way for airborne mobility.

Peenemünde Historical and Technical Information Centre

Housed in the former shelter control room and the area of the former power station, the centre documents what many consider the birthplace of space flight. One of five military proving grounds under the Army Weapons Office, the facility was used to develop the V1 and V2 rockets and is an Anchor Point of the European Route of Industrial Heritage. In addition to original documents and parts, the centre is also home to various types of aircraft and the world's largest conventionally-powered cruise missile submarine (Juliett class: NATO classification)